PostHeaderIcon Self-tailer

at the top of a winch, a clamping device that grips the tail of the line wrapped on the winch to prevent the line from accidentally loosening.

PostHeaderIcon Z Flag Rule

Racing Rules of Sailing for 2013 – 2016 rule 30.2 states, “If (International Code) flag Z has been displayed, (4 triangles, yellow, black, blue and red, formed into a square) no part of a boat’s hull, crew or equipment shall be in the triangle formed by the ends of the start line and the first mark during the last minute before her starting signal. If a boat breaks this rule and is identified, she shall receive, without a hearing, a 20% Scoring Penalty calculated as stated in rule 44.3(c).” The Z flag rule imposes a severe penalty on any boat that is on the course-side of the start line for any reason any time during the last minute of the start sequence. Compare to black flag rule and I flag rule.

PostHeaderIcon Dual-groove Head Foil

a slotted headstay system that contains two luff grooves to accommodate and provide continuous support for jibs or genoas that use boltrope. Usually made from aerodynamically shaped extruded aluminum or plastic and fitted over the headstay or forestay. A headsail is secured at the luff by sliding its luff tape/boltrope through a pre-feeder and then into the head foil feeder and up a groove. A dual-groove head foil allows for hoisting a second headsail in the second groove before dousing the first, so a boat can avoid running bare headed and losing performance. Harken’s brand is called Carbo Racing Foil. Schaefer Marine’s brand name is Tuff Luff. See also: jib peel.

PostHeaderIcon I Flag Rule

Racing Rules of Sailing for 2013 – 2016 rule 30.1 states, “If (International Code) flag I has been displayed (square yellow flag with a black center circle), and any part of a boat’s hull, crew or equipment is on the course side of the start line or one of its extensions during the last minute before her starting signal, she shall thereafter sail from the course side across an extension to the pre-start side before starting.” Dipping the line is inadequate. If a boat is on the course side at any time and for any reason during the last minute of a start sequence (such as being over early), to start properly, she must sail around either end of the line before restarting. Also referred to as the round-an-end rule. Compare to: black flag rule and Z flag rule.

PostHeaderIcon Riding Sail

describes two different styles of sail that help maintain a boat’s direction into or nearly into the wind during heavy weather or while at anchor. One style is a flat-cut sail with no belly; this is rigged from the backstay and tacked off to one rail at the shrouds. The other style is shaped like a wedge; this is rigged from a boom’s aft end and tacked to each quarter. Also called an anchor sail, backing sail, or stability sail. A riding sail is often used in combination with a sea anchor while at sea in storm conditions.

PostHeaderIcon Inversion

1) A departure from the usual increase or decrease of an atmospheric property with altitude. Inversion usually refers to an increase in temperature with an increase in altitude, which is the opposite of the usual temperature decrease with height. 2) A capsized boat that is completely overturned in the water. See also: turn turtle.

PostHeaderIcon Black Flag Rule

Racing Rules of Sailing for 2013 – 2016 rule 30.3 states in part, “If a (solid) black flag has been displayed, no part of a boat’s hull, crew, or equipment shall be in the triangle formed by the ends of the start line and the first mark during the last minute before her starting signal. If a boat breaks this rule and is identified, she shall be disqualified without a hearing….” The black flag rule imposes a severe penalty on any boat that is on the course side of the start line for any reason during the last minute of a start sequence (such as being over early). See also: BFD.

PostHeaderIcon DSQ

an initialism for “disqualified.” The scoring abbreviation used to indicate that a boat showed up for, but is disqualified from, a scheduled race. The boat has the maximum points allowed assessed against her when the race is scored using a Low Point System. The maximum points allowed may be different for an individual race than for a race that is part of a series longer than a regatta. See Racing Rules of Sailing for 2013 – 2016 Appendix A. The applicable Notice of Race or Sailing Instructions may also modify the number of points assessed.

PostHeaderIcon Estuary

a wide entrance to a lake or river where the tidal current meets the outgoing stream; or the area of the sea located at a river’s mouth.

PostHeaderIcon Poor Man’s Twin

flying two jibs simultaneously, one in each slot of a dual-grooved head foil (e.g., Tuff Luff) or with their hanks interleaved. One jib is sheeted to the boom’s aft end; a spinnaker or whisker pole holds out the other. Used for better performance downwind when a boat is too shorthanded to use a spinnaker. An illegal racing configuration. Also referred to as a butterfly. Compare to: double-headed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers