Archive for April, 2011

PostHeaderIcon Cap Shrouds

parts of the standing rigging that help support a mast laterally. Composite fiber, or stainless steel wire or rod, run from hull-mounted chain plates on the beams through any number of spreader tips, to their attachment points on the masthead. Cap shroud tension is typically adjusted with turnbuckles located just above the chain plates. Also referred to as V1s or vertical 1s. Also called sidestays. See also: chicken stays, continuous rigging, discontinuous rigging, Loos gauge, and mast jack. Compare to: diagonals.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Screaming Sixties

the area in the Southern Ocean south of 60° latitude to the coast of Antarctica, noted for exceptionally strong winds, huge seas and massive icebergs. Unlike in the Northern Hemisphere, there are no land masses in this southern latitude belt to slow the wind. See also: furious fifties and roaring forties.

Antartica-sm


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about the contents of this blog, or you would like Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Dirty Air

natural wind flow made turbulent by flowing over a boat and her sails, or by flowing over another object. Dirty air reduces sail efficiency, so a boat sailing in dirty air will sail more slowly than one in clear air. Sailing in dirty air on a beat allows boats ahead to pull farther ahead; sailing in dirty air on a run lets those behind catch up. Also called disturbed air. See also: blanket, snow-fence effect and wind shadow. Compare to: clear air.

PostHeaderIcon Retriever Line

a light line, attached to a patch located in a spinnaker’s center, that is used during a spinnaker takedown. See also: string drop. Compare to: tacking line.

PostHeaderIcon Zephyr

any soft, gentle breeze. The name derives from the ancient Greek name for the west wind, Zephyrus, a light and beneficial wind in Greece. On the Tower of the Winds in Athens, a lightly clad youth whose skirt is filled with flowers represents Zephyrus.

PostHeaderIcon Pickle Dish

a diminutive term for a winner’s trophy. So named because the trophy is often an engraved or embossed crystal plaque. See also podium finish.

PostHeaderIcon Mark Rounding Sheet

a log showing each competitors’ rounding order, and occasionally rounding time, at each race course mark. This information is useful at protest hearings and at requests for redress. Mark rounding sheets also serve as a cross-check for the race committee to identify any boats that may have cut corners and failed to round a mark.

PostHeaderIcon Point of Sail

describes a boat’s general direction of travel in relation to the direction from which the wind is blowing. The points of sail include beam reach, broad reach, close-hauled, close reach, in irons, and running. For the most efficient sail shape, your sails must be trimmed differently for each point of sail. See also: beating, forereaching, no-sail zone and sailing angle.

PostHeaderIcon String Drop

using a grinding pedestal-driven winch on a spinnaker’s retriever line to quickly douse the spinnaker into a bucket, chute or sock, or down into the sewer. Also known as a line drive takedown. See also: belly button and utility winch.

PostHeaderIcon Pickle Boat

the last boat to finish a race. Historically, boats that fished for herring to pickle would always be the last to dock. See also: DFL. Compare to: podium finish.

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