Archive for July, 2011

PostHeaderIcon Bog

a compound used to fill in low spots or to build up areas when fairing a hull, keel, or rudder. Made from a mixture of epoxy and microscopic glass beads, tiny hollow plastic spheres, or another low-density filler to add volume but not weight. Microlight is West Marine’s brand of fairing compound. Awlfair is Awlgrips’ brand. Also called builder’s bog, fairing compound, or fairing putty.


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PostHeaderIcon Southern Ocean

unofficial term used to designate the areas of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans surrounding Antarctica south of about 38° latitude; also called the Antarctic Ocean or Circumpolar Sea. Technically, the Southern Ocean extends from the coast of Antarctica north to 60° south latitude, coinciding with the Antarctic Treaty Limit. This official Southern Ocean was designated by the International Hydrographic Organization in the spring of 2000. See also: Screaming Sixties.

Antartica-sm

PostHeaderIcon Climb the Ladder

boats traveling at the same boat speed with their bows on the same line perpendicular to the true wind are said to be on the same ladder rung. The ladder rungs rotate relative to the boats as the winds shift. Any boat that anticipates wind shifts correctly and sails upwind towards the next shift (a header) will benefit more from the wind shift than boats farther away from the new wind direction; the boat will be on a higher rung. For example, when the winds shift left, the farther a boat is to the left, the more she gains over any boats to her right. The greater the separation between the boats, the more the boat closer to the new wind direction gains. Downwind a boat gains by sailing away from the next shift (a lift) and being the farthest away from the new wind direction. By staying in phase with wind shifts a boat can quickly climb the ladder over her competition. See also: favored side and leverage.


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PostHeaderIcon Power-up

to increase draft depth or camber in your sails, or to trim in to add more driving power. Compare to de-power and feather. See also: bag and blade.

PostHeaderIcon Ease & Squeeze

the process of easing your sails as a puff approaches, which allows you to gain more power, and then trimming in (i.e., squeezing the leeches) as the boat accelerates, which allows you to point higher. Compare to: scallop.

PostHeaderIcon Lightweight Sheets

a special set of sheets used in very light air. Constructed of lightweight, high-strength, low-stretch line such as Kevlar, they minimize the weight a sail has to carry. Sometimes referred to as light sheets.

PostHeaderIcon J/V Yacht Design

Judel / Vrolijk & Co. Racing yacht design firm in Bremerhaven, Germany founded by Friedrich Judel and Rolf Vrolijk in 1978. For more information, browse to http://www.judel-vrolijk.com.


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PostHeaderIcon Fleet

the collection of boats in a class, section, or area. For tactical purposes, after the start the fleet consists of only those boats that are most threatening and close enough to attack or be attacked. Also referred to as the pack.

PostHeaderIcon De-bone

jargon for removing battens from a sail.


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PostHeaderIcon Gassing

maneuvering your boat in such a way as to disturb the air flowing over another boat’s sails—whether by design or not. The affected boat is “getting gassed.” See also: blanket, disturbed air and lee bow. Compare to: herding, slam dunk, and tight cover.

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