Archive for July, 2011

PostHeaderIcon Fantasyland

a jocular term for the cockpit because the afterguard (typically stationed in the cockpit) must be dreaming if they think the crew can pull off the suggested maneuver in the time allotted.


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PostHeaderIcon Deck Sweeper

slang for an overlapping headsail that sweeps across the foredeck as you tack. See also: genoa. Compare to high-cut clew.

PostHeaderIcon Cornersville

a lonely place all the way to one side of a racecourse where a boat goes in search of a mythical strategic advantage. Cornersville is at the lateral extent of the racecourse where the extended laylines from the weather mark and leeward mark cross. Sailing all the way to Cornersville eliminates any advantages possible from wind shifts; lifts are no help to you and headers help every other boat but yours. Also called “banging the corner,” or going to “Rightsville,” or “Leftsville.” British and Commonwealth sailors call it “ringing the bell.” See also: overstand. Compare to: in the cone.


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PostHeaderIcon A-sail

shorthand for an asymmetrical spinnaker. A-spin and asso are other shorthand terms.

PostHeaderIcon Spool Shackle

a device used to retain a line attached to another fitting. With one version from Tylaska Marine Hardware, an eye splice loop is passed through a spool around another fitting and then over the ends of the spool. With another version from Equiplite Pty Ltd, a loop of line is passed laterally through a double-ringed spool. A control line is eye spliced around one of the rings. The line through the spool is fed through another fitting and over the remaining ring of the spool. The loop is held in place by a wrap of Velcro.


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PostHeaderIcon Courtesey Hike

an extra hard hike to compensate for someone who is temporarily off the rail.

PostHeaderIcon Chine

a hull design where the sides and bottom are on distinct planes. Hard chine describes little or no rounding where the planes meet. Soft chine describes some rounding while still maintaining distinct planes.


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PostHeaderIcon Back Down

to move backward or stern first. It is a common practice to back down by holding your boom to weather and backwinding the mainsail in order to clear your keel and rudder of any weeds or debris that either may have picked up.

PostHeaderIcon ARO

an initialism for “area race officer.” A US Sailing designated position for the person who administers the club race officer programs within each US Sailing geographic region. Also an initialism for “assistant race officer.”


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PostHeaderIcon Split Tacks

to take the opposite tack when sailing to windward with another boat.

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