Archive for October, 2011

PostHeaderIcon Dockominium

a boat slip purchased like real estate. It grants the owner perpetual ownership and tax write-offs for interest paid, if the docked boat is used as a second home.

PostHeaderIcon Coriolis Effect

the apparent deflection to the right, in the northern Hemisphere, of any free body in motion. In a meteorological sense, the Coriolis Effect is most often applied to apparent wind deflection, with maximum effect at the poles and none at the equator. The deflection is referred to as apparent because the free body appears to change direction as the Earth rotates out from underneath it.


For your daily dose of yacht racing, please Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or sign-up to receive Sailorspeak in your in-box. Thanks.

PostHeaderIcon BSA

1) Bahamas Sailing Association. For more information, browse to http://www.bahamassailing.org. 2) Bermuda Sailing Association. For more information, browse to http://www.bermudasail.bm.

PostHeaderIcon Bug

slang for a kink or knot in a sheet or halyard that prevents it from running freely through a fairlead or block. Also known as an asshole, blackaller or hockle.

PostHeaderIcon Vanderbilt Start

a type of out & back approach. A starting maneuver where a boat heads away from her intended starting point on a broad reach for a pre-determined time, jibes, sails close-hauled, and then arrives at the start line at full speed just as the starting gun is fired. Named for Harold Stirling Vanderbilt, a three-time defender of the America’s Cup. Also known as a timed approach, time on distance approach, timed run or a Vanderbilt approach.  See also half-speed approach and triangle approach.


Please share this post on Facebook using the link below. You can also Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or sign-up to receive Sailorspeak in your in-box. Thanks.

PostHeaderIcon US Sailing

the governing body and the national authority for the sport of sailing in the United States. For more information, browse to http://www. ussailing.org.

PostHeaderIcon PHRF

an acronym for “Performance Handicap Racing Fleet,” a registered trademark of US Sailing. A PHRF rating is a locally administered handicapping system that is based on a boat’s performance potential, her demonstrated performance, and other subjective factors in varying combinations, depending on which organization issues the rating. Sailboat race organizers in the United States use PHRF handicapping as a way to eliminate any design advantages or disadvantages, so dissimilar boats can race against each other in the same event and have results that reflect crew skill rather than equipment superiority. The boat with the higher rating—the slower boat—is handicapped in a particular race by the number of seconds equal to her rating minus the faster boat’s rating, times either the number of miles in the race or the elapsed time of the race. For example, boat A has a PHRF rating of 52 and boat B has a rating of 47. The race is 8 miles long. Boat A has a 40- second (52–47 times 8 ) handicap. If boat A crosses the finish line fewer than 40 seconds after boat B, boat A wins. See also: box-rule, level racing, one-design, time-on-distance correction and time-on-time correction. Compare to: IRC, ORR, and Portsmouth.


For your daily dose of yacht racing, please Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or sign-up to receive Sailorspeak in your in-box. Thanks.

PostHeaderIcon Stripper Line

a line used to temporarily hold a spinnaker’s tack during a peel. See also: changing sheet. Compare to: hobble.

PostHeaderIcon Canard

one or more retractable hull appendages that are mounted on the centerline and are lowered to supply lateral resistance. A boat may have one canard forward of the keel, or one forward and one aft of the keel. Compare to: bilgeboards and daggerboard.


Please share this post on Facebook using the link below. You can also Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or sign-up to receive Sailorspeak in your in-box. Thanks.

PostHeaderIcon Spook the Herd

1) several crew coming off the rail simultaneously, for various reasons, at an inopportune time. 2) Several crew moving around the boat at once and disrupting the boat’s balance. 3) Tricking a group of competitors into going the wrong way in order to gain some advantage. See also: herding.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers