Archive for June, 2012

PostHeaderIcon Wing Block

a block mounted on a swivel at or near a masthead at its outward lateral edge, or optionally from a crane or spinnaker bail. Often used to allow a full range of horizontal rotation for a spinnaker halyard, so it does not jump out of or bind on its sheave.

PostHeaderIcon Cutter Rigged

sailing with two sails set forward of the mast. For example, with a jib on the headstay and a staysail on the innerstay, or a sloop with a spinnaker flying forward of the headstay and a loose-luff spinnaker staysail tacked to a mid-bow D ring. See also: solent stay. Compare to butterfly jib and wing and wing.

PostHeaderIcon Vanderbilt Rules

a set of yacht racing rules developed by Harold Stirling Vanderbilt and others during the period of 1930 to 1960 until they were formally adopted by the International Yacht Racing Union (predecessor to the International Sailing Federation or ISAF).

PostHeaderIcon Deadman

a colloquialism for a spinnaker made from heavyweight cloth and used during heavy winds. See also: chicken chute.

PostHeaderIcon Seiche

like water that sloshes in a bathtub, a seiche (pronounced “saysh”) is a wave caused by prolonged strong winds or other atmospheric or seismic forces that push water toward one side of a lake, bay, or other enclosed or semi-enclosed body of water. This causes the water level to rise on that side and to drop on the opposite side. Gravity acts against the rising water, which causes the wave to oscillate until friction counteracts the wave force. See also: derecho. Compare to: tide.

PostHeaderIcon CMG

three letter initialism for Course Made Good. The average direction a boat is travelling due to her heading and the effects of tides, current and leeway. Also referred to as COG—Course Over Ground, and track. Compare to: DMG and SMG.

PostHeaderIcon Latitude

a partial reference to a position on the Earth’s surface. It is expressed as so many degrees north or south of the Equator. Circles of latitude are imaginary lines around the Earth, are parallel to the Equator, and represent one degree of arc. The Equator is zero degrees, the North Pole is 90 degrees north, and the South Pole is 90 degrees south. Degrees of latitude can be further subdivided into minutes and seconds: with 60 minutes per degree and 60 seconds per minute. One degree of latitude is equal to approximately 60 nautical miles, one minute of latitude is equal to approximately one nautical mile and one second is equal to approximately 100 feet. A position is expressed as degrees, minutes, and seconds; or degrees and decimal minutes. Also known as a parallel. Compare to: longitude.

latitude

PostHeaderIcon Changing Sheet

a line used to temporarily control a sail while its primary sheet is being re-rove to a new location or the sail is being peeled. A line to temporarily hold the tack of a new spinnaker that is being hoisted either inside or outside one already flying, or to hold the tack of the spinnaker already flying, during a spinnaker peel—in this case, the line is more correctly called a changing strop. One version consists of a medium length of nylon webbing with trigger-release snap shackles at either end. One shackle is connected to a bow cleat or stemhead, while the other end is clove-hitched to the headstay at shoulder height, with the snap shackle hanging two feet down. This version allows you to free the old spinnaker from the pole, so the pole can be used for the new chute. Another version consists of a 12-inch line with a trigger-release snap shackle at one end and a clip at the other. (See also: handcuffs.) This version allows you to keep the old spinnaker attached to the pole but to free the guy, so it can be connected to the new spinnaker. With either version, the snap shackles are under considerable load, so trigger release versions are used. You can spike off the old chute with a fid when the new one is hoisted and drawing. Also referred to generally as a strop. Sometimes called a stripper line or tag line. Compare to: hobble.

PostHeaderIcon Sailmaker’s Weight

unit of measure, in ounces (sm-oz), for a piece of fabric that measures 28.5 inches wide by 36 inches long; a sailmaker’s yard or approximately 80% of a square yard. For example, a 6 oz. fabric weighs close to 6 ounces per sailmaker’s yard. Compare to: gsm.

PostHeaderIcon Longitude

a partial reference to a position on the Earth’s surface. Lines of longitude are imaginary lines that run due north and south around the Earth through the Poles; they are perpendicular to the Equator. Longitude is expressed as so many degrees east or west of the Prime Meridian, the line of longitude that passes through the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England, and that is the zero-degree line. Degrees of longitude can be further subdivided into minutes and seconds: with 60 minutes per degree and 60 seconds per minute. A degree of longitude varies in size from approximately 60 nautical miles at the Equator to zero at the poles where all lines of longitude converge. A position is expressed as degrees, minutes, and seconds; or degrees and decimal minutes. Also known as a meridian. Compare to: latitude.

longitude

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