Archive for March, 2013

PostHeaderIcon Exit Shape

describes the curvature in a sail’s trailing edge. A rounded exit disrupts airflow and robs power from the sail. A completely flat exit is a mythical beast. It’s not whether there is any curvature to the trailing edge, it’s how much. A slightly round exit shape often looks bad without negatively affecting performance. Exit shape is influenced by leech tension, draft position and leech cord tension. See also: leech return.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Tacking Duel

to repeatedly tack in an attempt to elude or slow a covering boat or to continue to cover an opponent. Usually happens during the last upwind leg between the two lead boats, or between two boats in a battle for overall position in the standings. See also: simultack and sit on their face.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon True Wind Angle (TWA)

the wind angle relative to a boat’s centerline, if the boat were motionless in the water. The angle between the true wind direction and a boat’s heading. Compare to: apparent wind angle and boat wind.

PostHeaderIcon Made!

a verbal confirmation that a task, such as the afterguy being set in a spinnaker pole’s jaw, a sail being hoisted to its full height, or a line being made fast to a cleat, has been completed.

PostHeaderIcon Entry Shape

describes the curvature in a sail’s leading edge. A more curved or rounder leading edge allows for better acceleration and speed, and a wider steering groove. A flatter entry allows for better pointing, but makes the sail more prone to stall. Entry shape is only of concern on headsails and is controlled by halyard tension, headstay sag and draft position. Compare to: knuckle.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Isobars

lines drawn on a synoptic weather map that connect points of equal barometric pressure. Isobars extend around areas of high and low pressure. Pressure gradient wind speeds are inversely proportional to the distance between the isobars. Tightly spaced isobars indicate strong winds. Widely spaced isobars indicate weaker winds. See also: geostrophic scale.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon True Wind Speed (TWS)

the speed of the wind that blows across a boat that is motionless in the water. Compare to: apparent wind speed and boat wind.

PostHeaderIcon Jibing Angle

the angle between port tack and starboard tack courses for a given boat jibing in a given wind. There is typically an inverse relationship between wind speed and jibing angle; jibing angle decreases as wind speed increases. Compare to: tacking angle.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon SCAR Pins

retaining devices that are used to prevent turnbuckles from accidental loosening, but that can be quickly removed for rig tuning. SCAR pins consist of a cotter pin or post attached to and held in place by a Velcro strap that gets wrapped around the turnbuckle’s body. Works on both open body and slotted tubular turnbuckles. Also known by many other names, including high-speed pins, quick pins, smart pins, and wrap pins.

PostHeaderIcon Boat Wind

wind created by a boat’s forward movement. It is from the direction opposite that of the boat’s heading and at a speed equal to boat speed. Apparent wind is the vector of the sum of true wind and boat wind. See also: AWA, AWD, AWS. Compare to: TWA, TWD, TWS.

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