Posts Tagged ‘buoy racing’

PostHeaderIcon Course

1) Shorthand for racecourse. A course is made up of two or more legs that are denoted by marks. 2) A boat’s actual travel direction, expressed in degrees or a cardinal heading, as compared to her heading (the compass reading for where the boat’s bow is pointing) or bearing (the direction to or from a particular location). Wind effects, current, and leeway are what cause heading and course to be different. See also: COG.

PostHeaderIcon Lock It Up

a colloquialism that describes turning a helm quickly to its stop to effect a sharp turn. For example, to miss colliding with a mark after being frozen out of a rounding.

PostHeaderIcon Heading

the compass direction a boat’s bow is pointing, as opposed to the course, which is a boat’s actual travel direction, or bearing, which is the direction to or from a particular point. The effects of wind, current, and leeway are what cause the difference between heading and course.

PostHeaderIcon Envelope

describes how sensitive boat performance is to helm movement; the amount you are able to steer to either side of a boat’s current optimal sailing angle without negatively affecting velocity made good (VMG). Depending on the conditions and sail shape, the envelope upwind can be as narrow as one or two degrees, or as wide as five degrees. Downwind, the envelope can be as wide as 25 degrees. Flatter headsails and spinnakers create a narrower steering envelope. A headsail with a rounder entry (from more headstay sag or more halyard tension) makes the steering envelope wider, but at the expense of pointing ability. The steering envelope is wider, and a boat has more “feel,” when heeled over. Also called the groove or steering groove.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Adverse Current

current flowing in a direction other than that being sailed.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Dipping

to pass behind an opponent who is crossing on the opposite tack. You perform a dip by recognizing the need early, footing off to accelerate for only as long as necessary to clear, then resuming your previous point of sail as you pass just behind your opponent’s stern. Also known as ducking or taking a stern. Compare to: cross.

PostHeaderIcon ORR

Offshore Racing Rule. A measurement-based handicap rating system for offshore cruising and racing boats. The rating is based on a boat’s hull, her rig and weight measurements, her sail inventory, and the results of a velocity prediction program (VPP), a complex computer program that estimates a specific boat’s performance over a range of wind speeds and sailing angles. The Offshore Racing Association (ORA), an alliance of the Chicago Yacht Club, the Cruising Club of America, and the Transpacific Yacht Club, administers the ORR. For more information, browse to http://www.offshorerace.org. See also: corrected time. Compare to: box rule, IRC, level racing, ORC and PHRF.

PostHeaderIcon Corrected Time

the official running time of a race, for a particular boat, after any relevant handicap time-on-distance or time-on-time correction formula has been applied. See also: finish report, IRC, line honors, PHRF and ORR.

PostHeaderIcon Provision

to plan, acquire and stow any needed food and beverage items aboard a boat. Collectively, the items are provisions. known as victualing to sailors from Britain and the Commonwealth. See also: snacktician.

PostHeaderIcon Fat Layline

your sailing line to a mark along which you will have to foot or reach in order to round close to the mark. Your sailing line to a mark when you have over-stood it. Compare to: thin layline.

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