Posts Tagged ‘distance racing’

PostHeaderIcon IMOCA

an acronym for the “International 60-foot Monohull Open Class Association.” Established in 1991 and recognized by ISAF since 1998, it is the governing body for the Ocean Racing World Championships, which include the Vendée Globe, the Route du Rhum, and the Transat Jacques Vabre. IMOCA is an open class, so anything is permitted unless the rules specifically prohibit it. See also: Equipment Rules of Sailing for 2013-2016 C.2.3. For more information, browse to http://www.imoca.org.

PostHeaderIcon Course

1) Shorthand for racecourse. A course is made up of two or more legs that are denoted by marks. 2) A boat’s actual travel direction, expressed in degrees or a cardinal heading, as compared to her heading (the compass reading for where the boat’s bow is pointing) or bearing (the direction to or from a particular location). Wind effects, current, and leeway are what cause heading and course to be different. See also: COG.

PostHeaderIcon Heading

the compass direction a boat’s bow is pointing, as opposed to the course, which is a boat’s actual travel direction, or bearing, which is the direction to or from a particular point. The effects of wind, current, and leeway are what cause the difference between heading and course.

PostHeaderIcon Envelope

describes how sensitive boat performance is to helm movement; the amount you are able to steer to either side of a boat’s current optimal sailing angle without negatively affecting velocity made good (VMG). Depending on the conditions and sail shape, the envelope upwind can be as narrow as one or two degrees, or as wide as five degrees. Downwind, the envelope can be as wide as 25 degrees. Flatter headsails and spinnakers create a narrower steering envelope. A headsail with a rounder entry (from more headstay sag or more halyard tension) makes the steering envelope wider, but at the expense of pointing ability. The steering envelope is wider, and a boat has more “feel,” when heeled over. Also called the groove or steering groove.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Adverse Current

current flowing in a direction other than that being sailed.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Dog the Watch / Dog Watch

a way of rotating crew through the worst hours of standing watch by either having an odd number of watches per day, or dividing one watch in half and requiring crew to stand only half a watch. For example: having three 4-hour watches between 6:00 am and 6:00 pm and four 3-hour watches between 6:00 pm and 6:00 am.

PostHeaderIcon DMG

three letter initialism for Distance Made Good. The distance between starting and ending reference points, as measured along either a rhumb line or great circle route connecting the two points. Compare to: CMG and SMG.

PostHeaderIcon Dipping

to pass behind an opponent who is crossing on the opposite tack. You perform a dip by recognizing the need early, footing off to accelerate for only as long as necessary to clear, then resuming your previous point of sail as you pass just behind your opponent’s stern. Also known as ducking or taking a stern. Compare to: cross.

PostHeaderIcon Watch System

a method of assigning or scheduling regular work periods when crew members stand watch. An example of a two-watch system is: 6 hours on/6 hours off between 6:00 am and 6:00 pm, and 4 hours on/4 hours off between 6:00 pm and 6:00 am. See also: dog the watch and watch captain.

PostHeaderIcon Distance Race

a race conducted on a large body of water or across several bodies of water and that lasts an extended period of time—from a few hours to several days or more. Distance races can begin near one port and finish near another, or they can return to the starting port after covering considerably more miles than a buoy race. Distance race strategy evolves as a race progresses. Early in the race, the strategic priorities are to find the most favorable weather pattern, to get to the weather pattern before the competition and to be better placed within that weather system. Of course, as competitors approach the finish mark, tactics shift more towards those of a buoy race, where the priorities are to stay between any opponents and the next mark or wind shift, and to consolidate any leverage gained. Also referred to as an offshore race or port-to-port race. See also: Chicago Mac, Fastnet, Newport-Bermuda, and Transpac.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers