Posts Tagged ‘navigation’

PostHeaderIcon Estuary

a wide entrance to a lake or river where the tidal current meets the outgoing stream; or the area of the sea located at a river’s mouth.

PostHeaderIcon Solent (the)

the crescent-shaped English Channel sea-way that separates the Isle of Wight from mainland England.

PostHeaderIcon Quay

a man-made structure that is at the water’s edge and parallel to shore. Designed to allow for boats to moor alongside. Compare to: dock, marina, pier, and wharf.

PostHeaderIcon Course

1) Shorthand for racecourse. A course is made up of two or more legs that are denoted by marks. 2) A boat’s actual travel direction, expressed in degrees or a cardinal heading, as compared to her heading (the compass reading for where the boat’s bow is pointing) or bearing (the direction to or from a particular location). Wind effects, current, and leeway are what cause heading and course to be different. See also: COG.

PostHeaderIcon Run / Running

1) The point of sail away from the direction from which the apparent wind blows. If a boat is headed towards the 12:00 position, the wind is coming from anywhere between the 5:00 and 7:00 positions, i.e., you’re sailing greater than 135-degrees off the wind. Her jib is eased all the way out and set opposite the boom (See also: wing and wing) or she is flying an asymmetrical or symmetrical spinnaker. Her boom is set all the way out to the leeward shrouds. The apparent wind speed, the speed of the wind that flows over the boat, is lower than the true wind speed, because the boat is sailing away from the wind. Boat speed and wind speed cancel each other out. See also: reaching sheet. In more traditional nautical terms, sailing on this point of sail was referred to as sailing before the wind. Compare to: beam reach, broad reach, close-hauled, close reaching and DDW. 2) To allow a line to feed freely is to let it run. See also: blow.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Lock It Up

a colloquialism that describes turning a helm quickly to its stop to effect a sharp turn. For example, to miss colliding with a mark after being frozen out of a rounding.

PostHeaderIcon Heading

the compass direction a boat’s bow is pointing, as opposed to the course, which is a boat’s actual travel direction, or bearing, which is the direction to or from a particular point. The effects of wind, current, and leeway are what cause the difference between heading and course.

PostHeaderIcon Hard on the Wind

sailing as close to the apparent wind as possible while keeping your sails full and drawing. Your sails are trimmed in hard. See also: harden up.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Set

1) A reference for the compass direction towards which current flows. 2) Deployed; for example a headsail is set on a headstay.

PostHeaderIcon Bearing

the direction to or from an object, expressed relative to a compass or boat.

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