Posts Tagged ‘wind & waves’

PostHeaderIcon Riding Sail

describes two different styles of sail that help maintain a boat’s direction into or nearly into the wind during heavy weather or while at anchor. One style is a flat-cut sail with no belly; this is rigged from the backstay and tacked off to one rail at the shrouds. The other style is shaped like a wedge; this is rigged from a boom’s aft end and tacked to each quarter. Also called an anchor sail, backing sail, or stability sail. A riding sail is often used in combination with a sea anchor while at sea in storm conditions.

PostHeaderIcon Estuary

a wide entrance to a lake or river where the tidal current meets the outgoing stream; or the area of the sea located at a river’s mouth.

PostHeaderIcon Tacktick

a brand name of wireless racing instrumentation systems. For more information, browse to http://www.tacktick.com.

PostHeaderIcon Hole

an area with less wind strength than the surrounding area. This may be due to a lull—a short-duration decrease in true wind speed—or due to other atmospheric or geographic causes. Also known as a wind hole.

PostHeaderIcon Run / Running

1) The point of sail away from the direction from which the apparent wind blows. If a boat is headed towards the 12:00 position, the wind is coming from anywhere between the 5:00 and 7:00 positions, i.e., you’re sailing greater than 135-degrees off the wind. Her jib is eased all the way out and set opposite the boom (See also: wing and wing) or she is flying an asymmetrical or symmetrical spinnaker. Her boom is set all the way out to the leeward shrouds. The apparent wind speed, the speed of the wind that flows over the boat, is lower than the true wind speed, because the boat is sailing away from the wind. Boat speed and wind speed cancel each other out. See also: reaching sheet. In more traditional nautical terms, sailing on this point of sail was referred to as sailing before the wind. Compare to: beam reach, broad reach, close-hauled, close reaching and DDW. 2) To allow a line to feed freely is to let it run. See also: blow.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Headed Puff

a short-duration increase in true wind speed with a shift in true wind direction more forward than the prevailing wind direction; e.g., fewer than 45 degrees aft of a close-hauled sailing course. See also: header. Compare to: lifted puff.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon Round Up

a windward broach, where the bow turns into the wind and the boat heels considerably. Is potentially a catastrophic event and is only slightly less dangerous than a round down. To recover, the mainsheet, boom vang, and spinnaker sheet should all be eased. The guy should be kept trimmed, because easing it allows the kite to remain full, which could worsen the situation and prevent recovery. A good rule of thumb to remember is to “ease the wet side.” Once the boat is brought back under control, the sails can be trimmed back in again. Just as the boat is de-powered from back to front, she should be powered up from front to back. See also: broach.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon True Wind Angle (TWA)

the wind angle relative to a boat’s centerline, if the boat were motionless in the water. The angle between the true wind direction and a boat’s heading. Compare to: apparent wind angle and boat wind.

PostHeaderIcon Isobars

lines drawn on a synoptic weather map that connect points of equal barometric pressure. Isobars extend around areas of high and low pressure. Pressure gradient wind speeds are inversely proportional to the distance between the isobars. Tightly spaced isobars indicate strong winds. Widely spaced isobars indicate weaker winds. See also: geostrophic scale.


About the author:
Bob Roitblat is an avid sailor, writer and professional speaker. If you have any comments about this blog, or you are interested in having Bob to speak at your club, contact the author here: bob@sailorspeak.com

You may also be interested in Bob’s other blog, At The Helm, that is focused on the owners of small-to-medium sized closely-held businesses.

PostHeaderIcon True Wind Speed (TWS)

the speed of the wind that blows across a boat that is motionless in the water. Compare to: apparent wind speed and boat wind.

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